Why I stopped watching the Elisa Lam documentary

Right, I'm sure I'm gonna get some flack for this, but that's okay - we don't have to agree on everything. I started watching this documentary and made it to about halfway through episode 3. Nobody likes a quitter, but I've stopped watching. Here's why. It reeks of abusing a tragedy for entertainment. They've brought in all these 'YouTubers' and 'websleuths' to narrate the story, and frankly, it's disgusting. At one point a 'websleuth' starts crying saying he felt like he lost a sister, a friend. 'It's the outcome a lot of us didn't want' he said of her body being discovered. WTF?! Us? He's acting like he knew her but he's just a grief-thief - this is in no way HIS tragedy, but he's including himself in it. And he's literally a random websleuth. Aren't we all mate! They use tons of footage of a group of YouTubers/websleuths staying at the hotel, retracing her steps, going in the same elevator she was last filmed in, and up on the roof. They are GIDDY with excitement. It's like a night out on the town for them. 'My instinct says she was murdered' the websleuth said. His instinct? So, not evidence, or law enforcement, or eyewitness statements? Of course not, because there's no evidence a third party was involved (I'll get to that in a sec). He's gagging for a creepy mystery. He literally wants this to be more tragic and painful than it already is. Just think about that for a second. And Netflix let him talk about it on a documentary. When a YouTuber starts musing if she was sexually assaulted, I switched off. There's more footage in this 'documentary' of websleuths and YouTubers than with investigators. I dread to think what the family must think with all these people not just capitalising on, but jerking off to, their tragic loss. What happened to Elisa Lam will most likely always remain a question. Her behaviour had been reported to hotel staff prior to her disappearance for being strange. Her behaviour in the elevator was strange, almost like she was seeing something that wasn't there (she hadn't taken her anti psychotic), and I don't think it's a stretch to think she could have 'hidden' in the water tank from something she thought she was seeing and then drowned or succumbed to hypothermia when she was unable to reopen the hatch (which would have required her to push it to lift it up). Whether this was due to a bipolar episode, a reaction to a medication, or a bad trip, who knows. And I may well be way off because I'm not an investigator and I wasn't on the scene. I can't help but wonder if being on this sub makes me just as bad as the people involved in this show. I'm mostly here for the case I care about most - Asha Degree - but I also enjoy reading about other unresolved mysteries. But when do you cross the line between being interested and caring, and gagging for a tragedy because...fun. ? Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Elisa_Lam Autopsy report: https://web.archive.org/web/20200926063051/https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/24/el-autopsy/preview/page/1/ Interesting Reddit thread with emphasis on drugs: https://www.reddit.com/r/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/3amnrx/resolved_elisa_lam_long_link_heavy/ EDIT: Guys, I just woke up to 1.4k comments and quite a few awards. Thank you so much for contributing. I will read through every comment today. I recognise there are a couple of errors in my post (i.e. the lid) so thanks for clarifying. I'm glad I'm not alone in feeling this way. EDIT 2: I want to address what some people are saying about 'just watch episode 4'. I know what they are trying to do with this documentary to make it a 'social examination' of sorts. But in order to do that, they've given these idiots a platform, increased their followings/viewership, and given them validation as 'websleuths'. That doesn't change just because Netflix says they were wrong in the end. Also, the very fact that this show was made and marketed to be some kind of spooky, murderous mystery complete with slasher-flick-esque editing is exactly part of the problem that they claim to be calling out. Netflix has essentially created a trashy show exploiting someone's tragic death in order to call attention to how websleuths on social media are bad for creating trashy shows exploiting someone's tragic death. Ironic. submitted by /u/CountRavioli135 to r/UnresolvedMysteries [link] [comments]

Why I stopped watching the Elisa Lam documentary

Right, I'm sure I'm gonna get some flack for this, but that's okay - we don't have to agree on everything.

I started watching this documentary and made it to about halfway through episode 3. Nobody likes a quitter, but I've stopped watching. Here's why.

It reeks of abusing a tragedy for entertainment.

They've brought in all these 'YouTubers' and 'websleuths' to narrate the story, and frankly, it's disgusting. At one point a 'websleuth' starts crying saying he felt like he lost a sister, a friend. 'It's the outcome a lot of us didn't want' he said of her body being discovered. WTF?! Us? He's acting like he knew her but he's just a grief-thief - this is in no way HIS tragedy, but he's including himself in it. And he's literally a random websleuth. Aren't we all mate!

They use tons of footage of a group of YouTubers/websleuths staying at the hotel, retracing her steps, going in the same elevator she was last filmed in, and up on the roof. They are GIDDY with excitement. It's like a night out on the town for them.

'My instinct says she was murdered' the websleuth said. His instinct? So, not evidence, or law enforcement, or eyewitness statements? Of course not, because there's no evidence a third party was involved (I'll get to that in a sec). He's gagging for a creepy mystery. He literally wants this to be more tragic and painful than it already is. Just think about that for a second. And Netflix let him talk about it on a documentary.

When a YouTuber starts musing if she was sexually assaulted, I switched off. There's more footage in this 'documentary' of websleuths and YouTubers than with investigators. I dread to think what the family must think with all these people not just capitalising on, but jerking off to, their tragic loss.

What happened to Elisa Lam will most likely always remain a question. Her behaviour had been reported to hotel staff prior to her disappearance for being strange. Her behaviour in the elevator was strange, almost like she was seeing something that wasn't there (she hadn't taken her anti psychotic), and I don't think it's a stretch to think she could have 'hidden' in the water tank from something she thought she was seeing and then drowned or succumbed to hypothermia when she was unable to reopen the hatch (which would have required her to push it to lift it up). Whether this was due to a bipolar episode, a reaction to a medication, or a bad trip, who knows. And I may well be way off because I'm not an investigator and I wasn't on the scene.

I can't help but wonder if being on this sub makes me just as bad as the people involved in this show. I'm mostly here for the case I care about most - Asha Degree - but I also enjoy reading about other unresolved mysteries. But when do you cross the line between being interested and caring, and gagging for a tragedy because...fun.

?

Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Elisa_Lam

Autopsy report: https://web.archive.org/web/20200926063051/https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/24/el-autopsy/preview/page/1/

Interesting Reddit thread with emphasis on drugs: https://www.reddit.com/r/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/3amnrx/resolved_elisa_lam_long_link_heavy/

EDIT: Guys, I just woke up to 1.4k comments and quite a few awards. Thank you so much for contributing. I will read through every comment today. I recognise there are a couple of errors in my post (i.e. the lid) so thanks for clarifying. I'm glad I'm not alone in feeling this way.

EDIT 2: I want to address what some people are saying about 'just watch episode 4'. I know what they are trying to do with this documentary to make it a 'social examination' of sorts. But in order to do that, they've given these idiots a platform, increased their followings/viewership, and given them validation as 'websleuths'. That doesn't change just because Netflix says they were wrong in the end. Also, the very fact that this show was made and marketed to be some kind of spooky, murderous mystery complete with slasher-flick-esque editing is exactly part of the problem that they claim to be calling out.

Netflix has essentially created a trashy show exploiting someone's tragic death in order to call attention to how websleuths on social media are bad for creating trashy shows exploiting someone's tragic death. Ironic.

submitted by /u/CountRavioli135 to r/UnresolvedMysteries
[link] [comments]